History

nocturne painting

Siren: Based On The Painting "Nocturne"

Black. White. You can’t seem to have one without the other. It is their contrast that brings out their beauty.   Clouds on a spring afternoon, the dandelions in the pasture out back, the warm milk Ma brings…

Can You Hear Me Now?

Modern technology and media have changed how we communicate with one another as human beings. Where does our need for intimacy fit into this new communication formula? This essay analyzes how romantic relationships and digital intimacy function – particularly in…

riley dog photo

Dogs In The Laundry Room: Mental Health Treatment in Humans and Animals

I rarely think of the tornado. Sometimes, I forget it happened and am reminded by something small: a drizzling rain, the smell of the air in May, Pizza Rolls, a map of Oklahoma, barn swallows. Sometimes I tear my bedroom…

tiger photo

Nature of the Beast

I’ve always been a glutton; there’s no denying that. I’ve always licked my plate clean, not out of obligation to use what I’ve been given, but to bring about a bliss that only eating can elicit. While I tear through…

Takeover of Invasive Species Due to Climate Change: The Bush Honeysuckle

The Midwest region of the United States is composed of a variety of organisms that come from many different species and origins. From the western bank of the Mississippi River, to the eastern ridge of the Rocky Mountains, life of…

Christmas Holiday: Queering Family in 20th Century Southern Missouri

An obituary in The Southeast Missourian lists Elaine “Tommie” Davis as the business partner of Mary Jane “Miss Jane” Barnett for over forty years (Elaine Davis Obituary). However, the family albums of the two tell a richer story, they were…

"I Don't Know Where My Boy Is!": Abduction and Brainwashing in Stranger Things

In “Chapter Six: The Monster” of Netflix’s Stranger Things, there’s the big reveal: Eleven, the daughter of Terry, a former subject in the Central Intelligence Agency’s Project MK-Ultra, was stolen—abducted—by “the big bad Man” to be used as a psychic…

Importance of Art in Our Life

This issue is distinguished by the papers’ diversity in tackling different topics in areas such as culture, food, science, cinema, music, and arts. These papers highlight different topics that suit almost all audience trends and desires.

Questions of Policy

Many of the pieces published in this issue invite readers to think deeply about questions of policy—which course of action should be pursued in a given set of circumstances?

Essay Contest Winners!

The winners of our essay contest (sponsored by Mizzou Advantage) imagine new approaches to the ways we produce and consume food.

American War Mother's Memorial

Relaunch

In this inaugural issue of Artifacts’ relaunch, an emerging theme of these essays, stories, and poem is the work of remembering. Some do this by drawing our attention to aspects of history that still affect us decades later even when they are missing from our daily consciousness.

Environmental Issue

The myriad ways in which environmental conservation, stewardship, and sustainability find expression on MU’s campus would probably surprise most people. Global warming, electric cars, renewable energy——these may be controversial matters in our society, but as we watch the slow and uncertain rise of so-new technologies, and follow the political calculations surrounding policy changes shift with the price of oil, on the local level many are taking decisive action.

First Year Writing Special Issue

First-Year Composition at the University of Missouri———English 1000———is characterized above all by its diversity. While broad guidelines and goals underwrite what a phalanx of instructors implement in nearly 200 sections each year, the freedom instructors possess to teach to their strengths and interests is a hallmark that, if these essays are any indication, is a boon to MU students.

Collage

Issue 3

All Mizzou students have one important thing in common: they are writers. Thanks to the writing intensive courses across the University, students have the opportunity to experience different writing situations in every discipline. Mizzou students learn that different writing contexts demand different sets of strategies. Not only does the content change, but the way research and arguments are presented also change. The essays featured in Artifacts Issue 3 reflect the variety of writing that Mizzou students create every day. From technical reports to historical research to literary analysis, these essays are all snapshots of the Mizzou writer at work.

The Columns in Front of Jesse Hall

Issue 2

The second issue of Artifacts features articles on a range of topics, from a historical narrative of Mizzou'’s medical school to a critical analysis of engineering failure during Hurricane Katrina. These texts reflect sophisticated research skills, including archival and discipline-specific research. Every piece in Issue 2 developed from assignments in undergraduate writing classes at The University of Missouri.

Science of Environmental Effects of Nuclear War

The only atomic bombs to ever be used outside of testing were those used by the United States in Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end the Second World War. These blasts exploded with the force of about 15 kilotons and 21…

A War Between Two Worlds

Americans wound down Halloween 1938 gathered around their radios to hear Orson Welles read a rendition of War of the Worlds. Far from them snuggling up for a comfortable evening by the hearth, the broadcast sent a ripple of fear…

My Discovery of Interconnectedness

As a child, my mother would always tell me stories of my ancestors and distant relatives, but I tended to brush it off like it was not a big deal. At such a young age, my goal was not to…

A-po(pulation)-ca-lypse- The Danger of Overpopulation on the Environment Within America

Many reasons for the “apocalyptic” demise of the Mayan civilization have been hypothesized including the occurrence of a severe drought, thought to be exacerbated by rapid deforestation. Extensive logging was conducted to clear the land for growing more food and…

Retracing the Steps of British Abolitionists: A Digital Learning Approach to the History of the Atlantic Slave Trade

The transatlantic slave trade was the largest forced migration in history. It involved an intercontinental transfer of wealth, goods, and most importantly, millions of people over the course of four centuries. Great Britain was one of the chief participants…

King Arthur and His Part in the Breaking of the Round Table

Amy is an English Major and a senior at Mizzou. At the age of sixteen, she decided to drop out of high school and continue her education at a local community college. It was there that she found a passion for……

The Cultural Power of Iron in Early Africa

Iron played a central role in many societies of early Africa. It held both spiritual and material power. Physically, Africans used iron to create tools for agriculture, utensils for everyday life, and weapons for protection and conquest (Shillington, 2012, p.…

Birth of a Workforce: The Blacksmiths Rise in Sub-Saharan Africa

5. Ritual Staff with Seated Nommo. Iron. MALI, Early 20th century. The “Ritual Staff with Seated Nommo” made by the Dogon people from modern Mali available at the University of Missouri Museum of Art and Archeology represents the rise…

Hannibal, MO: “America’s Hometown” Amidst Fictional Landscape

We, as humans, are continually connecting with our surroundings in an interactive manner that has a profound effect on how we move through the world subjectively and react to the landscapes we inhabit. Bonding with specific locales is natural and pronounced when each individual is able to thrive within a regional group that has historical ties to an area rich with culture, generating substantial tradition. Fundamental to this place-based connection is an understanding of the transformative nature of landscapes.

The Concept of Death in Early African Societies

All cultures of the world find explanations for death and the afterlife. In the Christian faith, when believers of Jesus Christ and his Holy Father perish, they will have everlasting life in Heaven. In the Hindu faith, it is believed that when one dies, he or she will resurrect into a new form.

Proposed Hydroelectric Mega-Dam Project in Chilean Patagonia

Imagine a place where everything is measured by its majestic beauty: where bountiful nature exists in a pristine, untouched form, and discovery and exploration are encouraged among some of the most primitive, remote communities and man co-exists with fertile valleys, snow-capped mountains, winding rivers and streams, magnificent glaciers, and a slew of unique forest ecosystems.

Rocky Mountain Valleys of Southern Colorado

Rolling hills, mountain views, plenty of sunshine and history that blows through the wind—it is no secret as to why the peaceful residential mountain park of Garden Park Valley, Colorado is a primetime destination for a variety of people.

Giving Voice to Violence and Void

Irish-American masculine identity has a nebulous and bloody history. Its development began in the 1840s in Ireland and has its roots in colonialism – a story that, in itself, could fill a book-shelf. Despite this challenge, Martin Scorsese does an admirable job of exploring this dynamic in his film The Departed.

Classic Hollywood Cinema as Propaganda

Photography was the first use of pictorial proof as documentation of scientific analysis starting in the late 1800s. There was a sudden trust from viewers when they were presented with an image of presumed objective nature, emphasizing the ideology of “I’ll believe it when I see it.”​

The Legend Behind Zongzi

Zongzi, a traditional Chinese food, is made of sticky rice stuffed with special fillings and wrapped up in Argy-wormwood leaves.