Issue 2

Published in January 2009

The Columns in Front of Jesse Hall

Editor's Introduction

Issue 2

The second issue of Artifacts features articles on a range of topics, from a historical narrative of Mizzou’’s medical school to a critical analysis of engineering failure during Hurricane Katrina. These texts reflect sophisticated research skills, including archival and discipline-specific research. Every piece in Issue 2 developed from assignments in undergraduate writing classes at The University of Missouri.

Historical Photo of the Med School

A Tradition of Greatness: The Stories of Three Men at MU’s School of Medicine

Samuel Bezold

February 11, 1839 was an historic day for the state of Missouri. In fact, it was an historic day for the country; on this day was founded the first school of medicine west of the Mississippi River. The Missouri government had passed legislation to institute the school at the University of Missouri.

A History of the Maneater

Michelle Sarnosky

In 1955 when Joel J. Gold, better known at the time as Joe Gold, was approached with the opportunity to become editor of The Maneater, he was unaware of the change he was about to make. He was also unaware of the impact he was about to have on the student body of the University of Missouri-Columbia. He was your average “Joe” trying to make his way through college.

Critics of America’s Engineers Form Bashing Squad Following Katrina

Andrew Robertson

It doesn’t take much to blame a disaster like Hurricane Katrina on an act of God or on uncontrollable circumstances. Be reminded that nature, in all its beauty, has the power to destroy anything humans build. When the hurricane hit the Gulf coast on August 25, 2005, the levees separating Lake Pontchartrain from New Orleans collapsed. With many homes and businesses submerged in the torrent of water, the people within the city fought to survive. Even before the water level returned to normal, people reacted with frustrations toward the government, relief organizations, and engineers. People wanted to know what went wrong and who they should blame.

Book Review: Everything Bad for You is Good For You

Tyler Daniels

Almost immediately, Steven Johnson’s’ Everything Bad is Good For You presents a compendium of intriguing arguments and ideas. The title itself seems to promise a collection of contradictions and oppositions to a supposedly uniform state of thought. Instead of the typical argument against a two-sided issue (such as whether moral ambiguity is justified), Johnson changes the roles of the main separation of agreement between the evolution of popular culture and its effects on the mental capabilities of those who partake in such activities.

Rap, Dogs, Human Nature

Scott Thode

The buzzer sounded in the district championship of my senior year in high school. As I walked off the court in defeat, I took a glance up at the scoreboard, and the clock read all zeroes. It was really over.

Whitepaper on Design and Collaborative Practices

Tyler Ramsey, Jessica Peel, and Emmerich Schulte

Imagine a freshman student at the University of Missouri on the night before their first major exam. It is late at night and their nerves are now getting the best of them. They are stuck in front of a big stack of books and notes with no sense of direction and nowhere to turn for help. Coming to a large state university, many students have not yet mastered how to effectively learn and study. The Internet is the major medium of information for today’s students. Creating a freshman learning strategy website would be a step in the right direction to guide and inform students on topics such as time management, writing tips, and study strategies.

Hip Hop 1000

Kendall Dumas

Writing happens in a number of different forms. Student Kendall Dumas composed this original hip hop piece in order to reflect on his experiences in English 1000. This composition is a multimodal performance that builds on the rhetorical theory taught in English 1000.